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Warning: The following pest reports have not yet been confirmed with the appropriate National Plant Protection Organization. They are provided solely as an early warning to NAPPO countries, and all National and Regional Plant Protection Organizations should use this information with caution.

Subject: Swede midge (Contarinia nasturtii) found in Massachusetts
Publicada: November 29, 2005
Source: Pest Alert (MDAR and UMass Extension)

The swede midge (Contarinia nasturtii) is an introduced pest of brassicas that was discovered in North America in 2000.  Currently, C. nasturtii is present in Erie, Genesee, Orleans, and Niagara counties in western New York and 15 counties in Ontario and 20 counties in Quebec, Canada. The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) and University of Massachusetts Extension have been surveying for this pest in Massachusetts as part of the USDA, APHIS Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS).   This past summer they found the swede midge for the first time in Massachusetts.  Two specimens were captured in Hampshire County: one specimen in a garden in Northampton and the other in Hadley. 

For the full story and more information about swede midge, see:
http://www.massnrc.org/pests/linkeddocuments/pestalerts/swedemidgepestalert_September20_2005.htm  


Update December 20, 2005: Only ONE specimen (the one in the Northampton garden with mixed brassica species) was confirmed by DNA sequencing at Cornell University to be Contarinia nasturtii. Please visit this link for more information:
http://www.massnrc.org/pests/linkeddocuments/pestalerts/swedemidgepestalert_December14_2005.htm

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